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How solar energy works: a kid friendly explanation


When you hear the term “solar system,” you probably start thinking about planets, stars, and the Milky Way, but at Namaste Solar we start thinking a little closer to home. Our solar systems are made up of panels that use sunlight as energy to create electricity. We can use the light from the sun to power your home!

NS_LeftFork_071119_12Have you ever seen a solar panel up close? Our solar installers get to climb up on people’s roofs to attach the panels that are used to collect energy from the sun.

Working with the Sun

The sun is 93 million miles away from Earth, but it only takes 8 minutes and 20 seconds for its light to reach us. It produces light, heat, and energy that makes life on Earth possible. Sunlight is a renewable resource, which means it cannot be used up within your lifetime. Other renewable resources that nature will always produce include air, water, soil, plants, and animals. People have been using the sun to their advantage for hundreds of years from using solar energy in agriculture to constructing buildings and homes with windows facing the sun to pull in light and heat. At Namaste Solar, we harness the power of sunlight to help you create electricity for your home, creating positive impacts on the environment and saving homeowners thousands of dollars.

Your Very Own Solar System

Have you seen homes with solar panels on the roof or driven past a field full of panels collecting sunlight? Or maybe you’ve seen toys (such as a remote control car) that are powered by a mini solar panel? All of these panels work the same by absorbing photons from the sunlight, turning them into electricity, and then using a solar inverter to turn electricity into power that can be used to turn the lights on at your house, collect energy to power hundreds of homes, or make a flower dance.

Frey_142_professional-1Here’s a house with rooftop solar. Now, this family gets to produce a lot of their own energy instead of paying an electricity company!

Changing the World One Panel at a Time

Right now, the most common energy sources are coal, natural gas, and oil. These sources create greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane. The gases contribute to air pollution, which is harmful to the environment. Solar power cuts down on the need for these nonrenewable resources while also providing added benefits to the environment. Using a solar system to power your home helps fight climate change and reduces your carbon footprint. You can take this test to find out what your current carbon footprint is and learn more ways to cut back on your greenhouse gas emissions.

Sharing Solar with Your Neighbors

Sometimes installing your own solar system might not work for your family or your home. In that case, there are still great options to make a positive impact on the environment! One of those options is community solar. Some businesses have installed huge community solar gardens where they have rows and rows of solar panels. You can buy electricity from that solar farm, which offsets the energy you use from your utility company. Read more about how community solar works on this blog.

DJI_0001-HDR-1This is the Venture Community Solar Garden that Namaste Solar installed. Look how big it is! People subscribe to this solar garden to power their homes or apartments through the sun.

Thinking Closer to Home

If you’ve ever wondered about how to combat climate change as a family or thought about solar for your roof, now is a great time to find out how to bring the solar system to your home! Talk to one of our non-commissioned solar experts to get a free quote and figure out if switching to solar is right for you. We take a “no pressure, no commission” approach so that you can get your questions answered without having to deal with a pushy sales rep.

Bring the Solar System Home

 

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